Joanne Love

Gone are the days when sport was just about the enjoyment of playing a game. The past was about letting athletes progress naturally, without parental intervention or expectation being pushed upon anyone. The past was about enjoying each and every athlete’s progression, whether it was big or small. Today’s generation of athletes also want quick fixes and fast results. They bring with them their parents, who with all good intentions, only want the best for their child.Read more...

Sport plays a significant and influential role in the life and development of young people, especially those sports played within formal competitive arenas and managed by sporting organisations.  With two million kids under the age of thirteen quitting sport in the US every year, creating environments where kids can enjoy and achieve is paramount to success. Shared values are a way for coaches, parents and athletes to work together and support each other by finding a currency that each party values and in doing so, benefits the athlete. Differences in values and associated expectations often leads to conflict. For example, a coaches unannounced team’s aims or expectations may not match those of others. This creates conflict with parents – usually at the worse times, like game day. Some coaches wrongly assume they don’t need to share their team’s expectations, or they lack the confidence to expressing the direction they have set. Inevitably these assumptions happen because they are worried of what others may think, especially if it doesn’t involve winning.Read more...

The sporting environment can be as tough as it is rewarding. It is not just the athletes that have to push themselves to succeed, but it is also the support crew that must work to ensure the athletes can achieve their desired results. Over the past week we have witnessed the angst that the Rio Olympics have thrown up, with leaders of differing organisations calling for blood over the failure of the Australian team to bring home more gold medals. We see it at the highest levels in sport and we also see it in the Junior ranks with the support crew being substituted for parents.Read more...

Rio 2016 – The stands are closed, the people are leaving, and for Australia the finger pointing has begun. Over the past few days, I have witnessed finger pointing on the TV and in the print media. You only need to turn on the radio, and everyone is an “expert” voicing their opinions as to why Australia, and in particular, the swim team failed to bring home more Gold. We've even heard from Australian Olympic Committee blaming the “Winning Edge” program, and Kitty Chiller blaming the “insular culture.”Read more...

Rio 2016 – The inability of a number of our top ranked swimmers to stand at the top or even make it to the podium, has seen the Australian media lambasting our swim team for letting Australia down, yet again. These “back seat” experts, are quick to compare our swimmers with the American team, citing lack of racing, differing team selection timelines, and I could go on and on. But why did Mack Horton and Kyle Chalmers achieve or even better their goals, when the others failed? What makes the difference?Read more...

Rio 2016 - Today Australia sang with pride as we watched the 18-year-old Adelaide school-boy, Kyle Chalmers, win the blue ribbon swimming event at the Olympics, the Men’s 100m Freestyle. With team compatriot, Cameron McEvoy being the red hot favourite for the event, all talk centred on McEvoy’s opportunity to score Gold, and was little mention of Chalmers phenomenal swims over the past few days. Just like the sporting world, the business world is rife with competitive situations, and there are so many lessons that we can learn when we analyse how underdogs win.Read more...

The Australian Women’s rugby seven team created history today by becoming the first team to ever win a Gold in this event. Whilst the girls played magnificently to achieve this result, credit should go to the man behind the scenes that drove them to victory. Great coaches can take an athlete’s natural ability to another level, and Tim Walsh left no stone unturned to ensure that they had the best mindset, and could handle any obstacle thrown at the team. He not only improved their competence but openly learned from them at the same time. The techniques that Tim Walsh, utilised can all be used by leaders in the workplace to optimise their team’s performance in the workplace.Read more...

"He who angers you conquers you"   Elizabeth KennyRead more...

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